Imeni Frunze

Imeni Frunze (Russian: и́мени Фру́нзе, lit. named after Frunze) is the name of several rural localities in Russia:

imeni Frunze, Altai Krai, a settlement in Ust-Kazhinsky Selsoviet of Krasnogorsky District in Altai Krai; 52°35′N 86°20′E / 52.583°N 86.333°E / 52.583; 86.333
imeni Frunze, Vladimir Oblast, a settlement in Kameshkovsky District of Vladimir Oblast

See also: Frunze (disambiguation) and Frunzensky (disambiguation)

This article includes a list of related items that share the same name (or similar names).
If an internal link incorrectly led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Million Women Study

The neutrality of this article is disputed. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please do not remove this message until conditions to do so are met. (July 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Million Women Study

Mission statement
A confidential national study of women’s health

Type of project
Medical research

Founder
Valerie Beral

Funding
Medical Research Council
Cancer Research UK
National Health Service

Website
www.millionwomenstudy.org

The Million Women Study is a study of women’s health analysing data from more than one million women aged 50 and over, led by Dame Valerie Beral[1][2] and a team of researchers at the Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford.[3] It is a collaborative project between Cancer Research UK and the National Health Service (NHS), with additional funding from the Medical Research Council (UK).
One key focus of the study relates to the effects of hormone replacement therapy use on women’s health. The study has confirmed the findings in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) that women currently using HRT are more likely to develop breast cancer than those who are not using HRT.
Results from the Million Women Study, together with those of the WHI trial from the USA, have influenced national policy, including recent recommendations on the prescribing and use of hormone replacement therapy from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and from the Commission on Human Medicines.

Contents

1 Study design
2 Aims
3 Findings

3.1 HRT and breast cancer
3.2 HRT and endometrial (womb) cancer
3.3 HRT and ovarian cancer
3.4 Alcohol and cancer

4 Public health implications: Impact of the Million Women Study
5 References

Study design[edit]
The Million Women Study is a multi-centre, population-based prospective cohort study of women aged 50 and over invited to routine breast cancer screening in the UK. Between 1996 and 2001, women were invited to join the Million Women Study when they received their invitation to attend breast screening at one of 66 participating NHS Breast Screening Centres in the UK. At these centres, women received a study questionnaire with their invitation, which they were asked to complete and return at the time of screening. Around 70% of those attending the programme returned questionnaires and agreed to take part in the study, over 1 in 4 women in the UK in the target age group. The Million Women Study is the largest study of its kind in

Antonio Cassano

Antonio Cassano

Cassano playing for Italy at the UEFA Euro 2012

Personal information

Full name
Antonio Cassano

Date of birth
(1982-07-12) 12 July 1982 (age 34)

Place of birth
Bari, Italy

Height
1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)

Playing position
Forward

Number
99[1]

Youth career

1997–1998
Bari

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

1999–2001
Bari
48
(6)

2001–2006
Roma
118
(39)

2006–2008
Real Madrid
19
(2)

2007–2008
→ Sampdoria (loan)
22
(10)

2008–2011
Sampdoria
74
(25)

2011–2012
Milan
33
(7)

2012–2013
Internazionale
28
(8)

2013–2015
Parma
53
(17)

2015–2017
Sampdoria
24
(2)

National team‡

1998
Italy U15
9
(2)

1998
Italy U16
2
(0)

1999
Italy U18
2
(0)

2000
Italy U20
8
(2)

2000–2002
Italy U21
9
(3)

2003–2014
Italy
39
(10)

Honours

Representing  Italy

Association football

UEFA Euro

Runner-up
Poland & Ukraine 2012

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 8 May 2016.
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 24 June 2014

Antonio Cassano (Italian pronunciation: [anˈtɔnjo kasˈsano]; born 12 July 1982) is an Italian professional footballer who plays as a forward; he is currently a free agent, having last played for Sampdoria. A talented and technically gifted player, he is usually deployed in a creative role, as a supporting forward,[2] although he can also play in more of a playmaking role, as an attacking midfielder,[3] as well as on the wing,[4] or as a striker.[5] Nicknamed Il Gioiello di Bari Vecchia (“the jewel of Old Bari”), and Fantantonio (“fantastic Antonio”), he is known for his short temper as much as his skill and ability on the pitch,[6] which led to the coining of the neologism Cassanata by his former Roma and Real Madrid coach, Fabio Capello, in November 2002, due to their disputes over his actions. The word is regularly used by Italian journalists as a euphemism for any behavior incompatible with team spirit in football.[7]
Cassano began his professional club career with hometown club Bari, where he made a reputation for himself as one of the most promising, yet troublesome young players in Italy; his talent and performances earned him a transfer to defending Serie A champions Roma in 2001, where he immediately won the Supercoppa Italiana, and was named Serie A Young Footballer of the Year in 2001 and 2003. In 2006, he moved to La Liga club Real Madrid, where he gained

Arabs in the Netherlands

Arabs in the Netherlands
العرب في هولندا

Total population

(180,000[1])

Regions with significant populations

predominantly Randstad (Amsterdam, Rotterdam and The Hague)

Moroccans
60,000 (The Dutch Moroccan community counts an estimated 350.000 souls. But only 15% of them are of Arab origin. The remaining 85% are of Berber -mainly Riffian- origin).[2]

Iraqis
55,000[2]

Egyptians
23,000[2]

Syrians
10,261[2]

Tunisians
8,558[2]

Algerians
7,733[2]

Palestinians
6,000[2]

Lebanese
5,187[2]

Kuwaitis
1,524[2]

Jordanians
1,523[2]

Saudis
1,519[2]

Languages

Arabic language
Dutch language

Religion

Mainly Islam and minority Christianity

Related ethnic groups

Arabs, Arab diaspora

Arab Dutch (Arabische Nederlanders), also referred to as Dutch Arabs (Nederlandse Arabieren), are citizens or residents of the Netherlands whose ancestry traces back to the Arab World. Many of them might not actually be ethnically Arab due to the general confusion between the meaning of Arab and other ethnic groups coming from the same area (such as the case of Kurds, Berbers, Turkmen, Assyrians, Roma, etc.); therefore, the exact number of the actual Arab population in the Netherlands may be greatly biased and incorrect.

Contents

1 Politics
2 Notable people
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Politics[edit]
In 2001, two Arab immigrants to the Netherlands, Egyptian-born Farouk Ibrahim (58) and Moroccan-born Mustafa Aboustib, set up the Arab Democratic Party (Arabische Democratische Partij), complaining that Arabs were not well represented in mainstream political parties except as “pretty Arab faces”.[3] In 2007, a group of Arab Dutch have complained about the television network Al Jazeera’s effective monopoly on Arabic broadcasting in the country.[4]
Notable people[edit]

Khadija Arib, politician
Maryam Hassouni, actress
Laïla Abid, journalist
Ali B, rapper
Badr Hari, super heavyweight kickboxer
R3hab, DJ and electronic musician
Ramses Shaffy, singer
Hany Abu-Assad, film director
Arjan El Fassed, politician
Ramsey Nasr, writer
Kim Ghattas, journalist
Karim Rekik, footballer
Ismail, video game developer and part of Vlambeer
Mohamed Al-Daradji, film director.
Osama Rashid, footballer
Hesdy Gerges, heavyweight kickboxer
Imaan Hammam, fashion model
Yes-R, Dutch rapper
Amir Zeyada, kickboxer
Youssef Idilbi, Dutch actor
Marwan Kenzari, actor
Mourad Bouzidi, kickboxer
Karim Bridji, footballer
Rania Zeriri, singer
Rodaan Al Ga

Brush Creek, Missouri

Brush Creek is an unincorporated community in Laclede County, in the U.S. state of Missouri.[1]
History[edit]
A post office called Brush Creek was established in 1863, and remained in operation until 1975.[2] The community takes its name from nearby Brush Creek.[3]
References[edit]

^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Brush Creek, Missouri
^ “Post Offices”. Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 24 October 2016. 
^ “Laclede County Place Names, 1928–1945 (archived)”. The State Historical Society of Missouri. Archived from the original on 24 June 2016. Retrieved 24 October 2016.  CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)

v
t
e

Municipalities and communities of Laclede County, Missouri, United States

County seat: Lebanon

Cities

Conway
Lebanon
Richland‡

Villages

Evergreen
Phillipsburg
Stoutland‡

Townships

Auglaize
Eldridge
Franklin
Gasconade
Lebanon
May/Smith
Osage
Phillipsburg
Spring Hollow
Union
Washington

CDP

Bennett Springs‡

Other
unincorporated
communities

Abo
Agnes
Bidwell
Brownfield
Brush Creek
Caffeyville
Carrol Junction
Case
Competition
Delmar
Dove
Drew
Drynob
Eldridge
Falcon
Grace
Hazelgreen
Ira
Lynchburg
Lyons
Morgan
Nebo
Oakland
Origanna
Orla
Pease
Prosperine
Russ
Sleeper
Saint Annie
Southard
Winnipeg

Ghost towns

Atchley
Corkery‡

Footnotes

‡This populated place also has portions in an adjacent county or counties

Coordinates: 37°36′58″N 92°42′49″W / 37.61611°N 92.71361°W / 37.61611; -92.71361

This Missouri state location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

Chester teapot

The Chester teapot

The Chester teapot is the World’s Largest Teapot[dubious – discuss], which measures 14 feet (4.3 m) in height and 14 (4.3 m) feet in diameter. Its current location is on the former site of a popular amusement park, Rock Springs Park (1897–1970), off an onramp along U.S. Highway 30 in the City of Chester in Hancock County, West Virginia.

Contents

1 History
2 Gallery
3 See also
4 External links

History[edit]
It was originally brought to Chester in 1938 to represent the largest pottery industry in the world at that time. The teapot was originally a Hires Root Beer sign in the shape of a large barrel and was converted into a teapot upon its arrival in Chester. The teapot underwent restorations in 1990 and 2007 by the citizens of Chester. By coincidence Charles Elmer Hires’ root beer may also have had its inspiration in a kind of herbal tea.

Gallery[edit]

The Chester Teapot at night (2013)

See also[edit]

American tea culture
Teapot Dome Service Station

External links[edit]

Official Chester WV Site – World’s Largest Teapot
History of the World’s Largest Teapot
World’s Largest Roadside Attractions article

v
t
e

The Northern Panhandle of West Virginia

Counties

Brooke
Hancock
Marshall
Ohio

Communities

Beech Bottom
Benwood
Bethlehem
Bethany
Cameron
Chester
Clearview
Follansbee
Glen Dale
McMechen
Moundsville
New Cumberland
New Vrindaban
Triadelphia
Valley Grove
Weirton
Wellsburg
West Liberty
Wheeling
Windsor Heights

Attractions

Bethany College
Capitol Theatre
Chester Teapot
Grave Creek Mound
Mountaineer Casino, Racetrack and Resort
Oglebay Park
Palace of Gold
Tomlinson Run State Park
West Liberty University
West Virginia Independence Hall
West Virginia Northern Community College
West Virginia State Penitentiary
Wheeling Island
Wheeling Island Hotel-Casino-Racetrack
Wheeling Jesuit University
Wheeling Suspension Bridge
The Highlands

Coordinates: 40°36′58″N 80°33′26″W / 40.616119°N 80.557249°W / 40.616119; -80.557249

This West Virginia-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

Appias nephele

Appias nephele

Appias nephele depicted in Illustrations of New Species of Exotic Butterflies

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Lepidoptera

Family:
Pieridae

Genus:
Appias

Species:
A. nephele

Binomial name

Appias nephele
(Hewitson, 1861)

Synonyms

Pieris nephele Hewitson, 1861
Tachyris nephele var. dilutior Staudinger, 1889

Appias nephele is a species of pierine butterfly endemic to the Philippines.[1]
Subspecies[edit]

Appias nephele nephele (Philippines: Luzon)
Appias nephele aufidia Fruhstorfer, 1910 (Philippines: Basilan)
Appias nephele dilutior (Staudinger, 1889) Philippines: Palawan)
Appias nephele elis Fruhstorfer, 1910 (Philippines: Mindanao)
Appias nephele hostilia Fruhstorfer, 1910 (Philippines: Sulu Islands)
Appias nephele invitabilis Fruhstorfer, 1910 (Philippines: Mindoro)
Appias nephele leytensis Fruhstorfer, 1911 (Philippines: Leyte)

References[edit]

^ Appias funet.fi

External links[edit]

images representing Appias nephele at Encyclopedia of Life

Mount Morgan (Montana)

Mount Morgan

Highest point

Elevation
8,781 ft (2,676 m) [1]

Prominence
941 ft (287 m) [1]

Coordinates
48°30′50″N 113°28′21″W / 48.51389°N 113.47250°W / 48.51389; -113.47250Coordinates: 48°30′50″N 113°28′21″W / 48.51389°N 113.47250°W / 48.51389; -113.47250 [2]

Geography

Location
Flathead County, Montana, Glacier County, Montana, U.S.

Parent range
Lewis Range

Topo map
USGS Cut Bank Pass, MT

Mount Morgan (8,781 feet (2,676 m)) is located in the Lewis Range, Glacier National Park in the U.S. state of Montana.[1] Mount Morgan is situated along the Continental Divide. Oldman Lake is immediately east of the peak.
See also[edit]

Mountains and mountain ranges of Glacier National Park (U.S.)

References[edit]

^ a b c “Mount Morgan, Montana”. Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2010-07-03. 
^ “Mount Morgan”. Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2010-07-03. 

This Montana state location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

Jamestown High School (New York)

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Jamestown High School

Location

350 East Second Street
Jamestown, New York 14701

Coordinates
42°05′46″N 79°14′08″W / 42.09623°N 79.23548°W / 42.09623; -79.23548Coordinates: 42°05′46″N 79°14′08″W / 42.09623°N 79.23548°W / 42.09623; -79.23548

Information

Type
Public

Established
1867

School district
Jamestown City School District

Superintendent
Tim O. Mains

NCES School ID
361563001350[1]

Principal
Mike McElrath, PhD

Grades
9–12

Enrollment
1,502

Number of students
1,600

Color(s)
Red and green

Mascot
Red Raider

Website
Official site

Early postcard showing school, circa 1906–1916

Jamestown High School (JHS) is a public high school located in Jamestown, New York, United States. It is the sole public high school within the city limits of Jamestown, and educates high school freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Contents

1 Music
2 Academics
3 Sports
4 Clubs and organizations
5 References
6 External links

Music[edit]

This section relies largely or entirely upon a single source. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources. (October 2016)

Jamestown High School has a long tradition of excellence in its music and arts program. 1903 marked the publishing of the first yearbook. In 1924, the Band and A Cappella Choir were founded, which still exist today. In 1934, the present day building began construction as part of Roosevelt’s New Deal. The new school building was officially finished on November 15, 1935. In 1979, the first Battle of the Classes took place, which still continues today. The event raised about $250,000 over the course of 30 years for local charities. From 1984-87, the school went through modernization, including the construction of a new gym.
In 1980 the marching band came under the direction of Louis A. Deppas. In 1982 the band represented all of New York State at the Festival of States in St. Petersburg, Florida. There they placed 3rd, 4th, and 7th in Concert, Parade, and Field Band competitions respectively. The band represented NYS in 1984 at the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, and on New Year’s Day 1986 at t

Andreus

Andreus (/ˈændriəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀνδρεύς) was the son of the river-god Peneus in Thessaly, from whom the district about Orchomenos in Boeotia was called Andreis.[1] In another passage Pausanias speaks of Andreus (it is, however, uncertain whether he means the same man as the former) as the person who first colonized the island of Andros.[2] According to Diodorus Siculus, Andreus was one of the generals of Rhadamanthys, from whom he received the island afterwards called Andros as a present.[3] Stephanus of Byzantium,[4] Conon[5] and Ovid[6] call this first colonizer “Andrus” (son of Anius) and not Andreus.[7] With Evippe, daughter of Leucon, Andreus had a son Eteocles, his successor.[8]
References[edit]

^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 34. 6
^ Paus. 10. 13. 4
^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 5. 79. 2
^ S. v. Andros
^ Narrations, 41
^ Metamorphoses, 14. 639
^ Myth Index – Andreus
^ Paus. 9. 34. 9 – 9. 35. 1

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Smith, William, ed. (1870). “article name needed”. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 

v
t
e

Kings of Thebes

Kings

Calydnus
Ogyges
Cadmus
Pentheus
Polydorus
Nycteus (regent for Labdacus) and Lycus I (regent for Labdacus)
Labdacus
Lycus I (regent for Laius)
Laius
Amphion and Zethus
Laius (second rule)
Creon
Oedipus
Creon (second rule) (regent for Eteocles and Polynices)
Polynices and Eteocles
Creon (third rule) (regent for Laodamas)
Lycus II (usurper)
Laodamas
Thersander
Peneleos (regent for Tisamenus)
Tisamenus
Autesion
Damasichthon
Ptolemy
Xanthos

In literature

Antigone
Antigone (Euripides)
The Bacchae
Herakles
Iliad
Oedipus
Oedipus at Colonus
Oedipus the King
The Phoenician Women
Seven Against Thebes
The Thebans

Related articles

Thebes
Necklace of Harmonia

Book:Theban Kings
Category:Theban kings
Portal:Ancient Greece