Andreus

Andreus (/ˈændriəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀνδρεύς) was the son of the river-god Peneus in Thessaly, from whom the district about Orchomenos in Boeotia was called Andreis.[1] In another passage Pausanias speaks of Andreus (it is, however, uncertain whether he means the same man as the former) as the person who first colonized the island of Andros.[2] According to Diodorus Siculus, Andreus was one of the generals of Rhadamanthys, from whom he received the island afterwards called Andros as a present.[3] Stephanus of Byzantium,[4] Conon[5] and Ovid[6] call this first colonizer “Andrus” (son of Anius) and not Andreus.[7] With Evippe, daughter of Leucon, Andreus had a son Eteocles, his successor.[8]
References[edit]

^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 34. 6
^ Paus. 10. 13. 4
^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 5. 79. 2
^ S. v. Andros
^ Narrations, 41
^ Metamorphoses, 14. 639
^ Myth Index – Andreus
^ Paus. 9. 34. 9 – 9. 35. 1

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Smith, William, ed. (1870). “article name needed”. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 

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Kings of Thebes

Kings

Calydnus
Ogyges
Cadmus
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Polydorus
Nycteus (regent for Labdacus) and Lycus I (regent for Labdacus)
Labdacus
Lycus I (regent for Laius)
Laius
Amphion and Zethus
Laius (second rule)
Creon
Oedipus
Creon (second rule) (regent for Eteocles and Polynices)
Polynices and Eteocles
Creon (third rule) (regent for Laodamas)
Lycus II (usurper)
Laodamas
Thersander
Peneleos (regent for Tisamenus)
Tisamenus
Autesion
Damasichthon
Ptolemy
Xanthos

In literature

Antigone
Antigone (Euripides)
The Bacchae
Herakles
Iliad
Oedipus
Oedipus at Colonus
Oedipus the King
The Phoenician Women
Seven Against Thebes
The Thebans

Related articles

Thebes
Necklace of Harmonia

Book:Theban Kings
Category:Theban kings
Portal:Ancient Greece