Antonio Cassano

Antonio Cassano

Cassano playing for Italy at the UEFA Euro 2012

Personal information

Full name
Antonio Cassano

Date of birth
(1982-07-12) 12 July 1982 (age 34)

Place of birth
Bari, Italy

Height
1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)

Playing position
Forward

Number
99[1]

Youth career

1997–1998
Bari

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

1999–2001
Bari
48
(6)

2001–2006
Roma
118
(39)

2006–2008
Real Madrid
19
(2)

2007–2008
→ Sampdoria (loan)
22
(10)

2008–2011
Sampdoria
74
(25)

2011–2012
Milan
33
(7)

2012–2013
Internazionale
28
(8)

2013–2015
Parma
53
(17)

2015–2017
Sampdoria
24
(2)

National team‡

1998
Italy U15
9
(2)

1998
Italy U16
2
(0)

1999
Italy U18
2
(0)

2000
Italy U20
8
(2)

2000–2002
Italy U21
9
(3)

2003–2014
Italy
39
(10)

Honours

Representing  Italy

Association football

UEFA Euro

Runner-up
Poland & Ukraine 2012

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 8 May 2016.
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 24 June 2014

Antonio Cassano (Italian pronunciation: [anˈtɔnjo kasˈsano]; born 12 July 1982) is an Italian professional footballer who plays as a forward; he is currently a free agent, having last played for Sampdoria. A talented and technically gifted player, he is usually deployed in a creative role, as a supporting forward,[2] although he can also play in more of a playmaking role, as an attacking midfielder,[3] as well as on the wing,[4] or as a striker.[5] Nicknamed Il Gioiello di Bari Vecchia (“the jewel of Old Bari”), and Fantantonio (“fantastic Antonio”), he is known for his short temper as much as his skill and ability on the pitch,[6] which led to the coining of the neologism Cassanata by his former Roma and Real Madrid coach, Fabio Capello, in November 2002, due to their disputes over his actions. The word is regularly used by Italian journalists as a euphemism for any behavior incompatible with team spirit in football.[7]
Cassano began his professional club career with hometown club Bari, where he made a reputation for himself as one of the most promising, yet troublesome young players in Italy; his talent and performances earned him a transfer to defending Serie A champions Roma in 2001, where he immediately won the Supercoppa Italiana, and was named Serie A Young Footballer of the Year in 2001 and 2003. In 2006, he moved to La Liga club Real Madrid, where he gained

Jerry Singirok

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (December 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Jerry Singirok was the commander of the Papua New Guinea Defence Force throughout the Sandline affair of 1997.

Contents

1 Military career
2 Sandline affair
3 Dismissal and subsequent inquiry
4 Legacy
5 References

Military career[edit]
Singirok was a career soldier who had risen through the ranks of the PNGDF, including a time as commander of the forces on Bougainville. In the mid-1990s, he was promoted to Brigadier-General, and given the position of commander.
Then, in 1996, Tim Spicer, an ex-Colonel in the Scots Guards, who had recently founded the mercenary firm Sandline International, met with Singirok. Spicer attempted to persuade Singirok to support a package of military support that Spicer had negotiated with then-defence minister Mathias Ijape. Singirok declined, but the deal went ahead anyway, with the support of Ijape, Prime Minister Sir Julius Chan and Deputy Prime Minister Chris Haiveta.
It is unclear just how much Singirok knew of the events in between that meeting and the leaking of the affair to the international media on 10 February 1997. When the story broke in The Australian newspaper, Singirok was in the Philippines, and the mercenaries were already in Port Moresby. When he returned on 27 February, his mind was made up. He condemned the government for leaving him, as head of the PNGDF, out of the loop, and condemned Spicer for having more access to the government than he did. Over the next week, he made plans for Operation Rausim Kwik (pidgin for ‘get rid of them fast’). On 8 March, he asked Major Walter Enuma to command the operation. Enuma agreed.
Sandline affair[edit]
Main article: Sandline affair
On the night of 16 March, Singirok’s soldiers swooped. They arrested Spicer, the mercenaries, and their support staff. The next morning, Singirok went on national radio, and accused Prime Minister Chan, Defence Minister Ijape, and Deputy Prime Minister Haiveta of corruption, and gave them 48 hours to resign. He also fiercely denied allegations that he was aiming to take power himself. Chan refused to resign, and the same day, sacked Singirok as Commander of the PNGDF, replacing him with the c

Gareth Edwards (Berkshire cricketer)

For other people with the same name, see Gareth Edwards (disambiguation).
Gareth Edwards (born 30 November 1973) was an English cricketer who played for Berkshire. He was born in Exeter.
Having represented Berkshire in the Minor Counties Championship between 1997 and 2001, Edwards made a single List A appearance for the team, in the 1999 NatWest Trophy, against Devon. From the tailend, Edwards scored 5 runs, and took bowling figures of 0-30 from six overs of bowling.
External links[edit]

Gareth Edwards at Cricket Archive