Million Women Study

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Million Women Study

Mission statement
A confidential national study of women’s health

Type of project
Medical research

Founder
Valerie Beral

Funding
Medical Research Council
Cancer Research UK
National Health Service

Website
www.millionwomenstudy.org

The Million Women Study is a study of women’s health analysing data from more than one million women aged 50 and over, led by Dame Valerie Beral[1][2] and a team of researchers at the Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford.[3] It is a collaborative project between Cancer Research UK and the National Health Service (NHS), with additional funding from the Medical Research Council (UK).
One key focus of the study relates to the effects of hormone replacement therapy use on women’s health. The study has confirmed the findings in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) that women currently using HRT are more likely to develop breast cancer than those who are not using HRT.
Results from the Million Women Study, together with those of the WHI trial from the USA, have influenced national policy, including recent recommendations on the prescribing and use of hormone replacement therapy from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and from the Commission on Human Medicines.

Contents

1 Study design
2 Aims
3 Findings

3.1 HRT and breast cancer
3.2 HRT and endometrial (womb) cancer
3.3 HRT and ovarian cancer
3.4 Alcohol and cancer

4 Public health implications: Impact of the Million Women Study
5 References

Study design[edit]
The Million Women Study is a multi-centre, population-based prospective cohort study of women aged 50 and over invited to routine breast cancer screening in the UK. Between 1996 and 2001, women were invited to join the Million Women Study when they received their invitation to attend breast screening at one of 66 participating NHS Breast Screening Centres in the UK. At these centres, women received a study questionnaire with their invitation, which they were asked to complete and return at the time of screening. Around 70% of those attending the programme returned questionnaires and agreed to take part in the study, over 1 in 4 women in the UK in the target age group. The Million Women Study is the largest study of its kind in

Arabs in the Netherlands

Arabs in the Netherlands
العرب في هولندا

Total population

(180,000[1])

Regions with significant populations

predominantly Randstad (Amsterdam, Rotterdam and The Hague)

Moroccans
60,000 (The Dutch Moroccan community counts an estimated 350.000 souls. But only 15% of them are of Arab origin. The remaining 85% are of Berber -mainly Riffian- origin).[2]

Iraqis
55,000[2]

Egyptians
23,000[2]

Syrians
10,261[2]

Tunisians
8,558[2]

Algerians
7,733[2]

Palestinians
6,000[2]

Lebanese
5,187[2]

Kuwaitis
1,524[2]

Jordanians
1,523[2]

Saudis
1,519[2]

Languages

Arabic language
Dutch language

Religion

Mainly Islam and minority Christianity

Related ethnic groups

Arabs, Arab diaspora

Arab Dutch (Arabische Nederlanders), also referred to as Dutch Arabs (Nederlandse Arabieren), are citizens or residents of the Netherlands whose ancestry traces back to the Arab World. Many of them might not actually be ethnically Arab due to the general confusion between the meaning of Arab and other ethnic groups coming from the same area (such as the case of Kurds, Berbers, Turkmen, Assyrians, Roma, etc.); therefore, the exact number of the actual Arab population in the Netherlands may be greatly biased and incorrect.

Contents

1 Politics
2 Notable people
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Politics[edit]
In 2001, two Arab immigrants to the Netherlands, Egyptian-born Farouk Ibrahim (58) and Moroccan-born Mustafa Aboustib, set up the Arab Democratic Party (Arabische Democratische Partij), complaining that Arabs were not well represented in mainstream political parties except as “pretty Arab faces”.[3] In 2007, a group of Arab Dutch have complained about the television network Al Jazeera’s effective monopoly on Arabic broadcasting in the country.[4]
Notable people[edit]

Khadija Arib, politician
Maryam Hassouni, actress
Laïla Abid, journalist
Ali B, rapper
Badr Hari, super heavyweight kickboxer
R3hab, DJ and electronic musician
Ramses Shaffy, singer
Hany Abu-Assad, film director
Arjan El Fassed, politician
Ramsey Nasr, writer
Kim Ghattas, journalist
Karim Rekik, footballer
Ismail, video game developer and part of Vlambeer
Mohamed Al-Daradji, film director.
Osama Rashid, footballer
Hesdy Gerges, heavyweight kickboxer
Imaan Hammam, fashion model
Yes-R, Dutch rapper
Amir Zeyada, kickboxer
Youssef Idilbi, Dutch actor
Marwan Kenzari, actor
Mourad Bouzidi, kickboxer
Karim Bridji, footballer
Rania Zeriri, singer
Rodaan Al Ga

Mount Morgan (Montana)

Mount Morgan

Highest point

Elevation
8,781 ft (2,676 m) [1]

Prominence
941 ft (287 m) [1]

Coordinates
48°30′50″N 113°28′21″W / 48.51389°N 113.47250°W / 48.51389; -113.47250Coordinates: 48°30′50″N 113°28′21″W / 48.51389°N 113.47250°W / 48.51389; -113.47250 [2]

Geography

Location
Flathead County, Montana, Glacier County, Montana, U.S.

Parent range
Lewis Range

Topo map
USGS Cut Bank Pass, MT

Mount Morgan (8,781 feet (2,676 m)) is located in the Lewis Range, Glacier National Park in the U.S. state of Montana.[1] Mount Morgan is situated along the Continental Divide. Oldman Lake is immediately east of the peak.
See also[edit]

Mountains and mountain ranges of Glacier National Park (U.S.)

References[edit]

^ a b c “Mount Morgan, Montana”. Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2010-07-03. 
^ “Mount Morgan”. Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2010-07-03. 

This Montana state location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Jamestown High School (New York)

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Jamestown High School

Location

350 East Second Street
Jamestown, New York 14701

Coordinates
42°05′46″N 79°14′08″W / 42.09623°N 79.23548°W / 42.09623; -79.23548Coordinates: 42°05′46″N 79°14′08″W / 42.09623°N 79.23548°W / 42.09623; -79.23548

Information

Type
Public

Established
1867

School district
Jamestown City School District

Superintendent
Tim O. Mains

NCES School ID
361563001350[1]

Principal
Mike McElrath, PhD

Grades
9–12

Enrollment
1,502

Number of students
1,600

Color(s)
Red and green

Mascot
Red Raider

Website
Official site

Early postcard showing school, circa 1906–1916

Jamestown High School (JHS) is a public high school located in Jamestown, New York, United States. It is the sole public high school within the city limits of Jamestown, and educates high school freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Contents

1 Music
2 Academics
3 Sports
4 Clubs and organizations
5 References
6 External links

Music[edit]

This section relies largely or entirely upon a single source. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources. (October 2016)

Jamestown High School has a long tradition of excellence in its music and arts program. 1903 marked the publishing of the first yearbook. In 1924, the Band and A Cappella Choir were founded, which still exist today. In 1934, the present day building began construction as part of Roosevelt’s New Deal. The new school building was officially finished on November 15, 1935. In 1979, the first Battle of the Classes took place, which still continues today. The event raised about $250,000 over the course of 30 years for local charities. From 1984-87, the school went through modernization, including the construction of a new gym.
In 1980 the marching band came under the direction of Louis A. Deppas. In 1982 the band represented all of New York State at the Festival of States in St. Petersburg, Florida. There they placed 3rd, 4th, and 7th in Concert, Parade, and Field Band competitions respectively. The band represented NYS in 1984 at the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, and on New Year’s Day 1986 at t

Andreus

Andreus (/ˈændriəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀνδρεύς) was the son of the river-god Peneus in Thessaly, from whom the district about Orchomenos in Boeotia was called Andreis.[1] In another passage Pausanias speaks of Andreus (it is, however, uncertain whether he means the same man as the former) as the person who first colonized the island of Andros.[2] According to Diodorus Siculus, Andreus was one of the generals of Rhadamanthys, from whom he received the island afterwards called Andros as a present.[3] Stephanus of Byzantium,[4] Conon[5] and Ovid[6] call this first colonizer “Andrus” (son of Anius) and not Andreus.[7] With Evippe, daughter of Leucon, Andreus had a son Eteocles, his successor.[8]
References[edit]

^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 34. 6
^ Paus. 10. 13. 4
^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 5. 79. 2
^ S. v. Andros
^ Narrations, 41
^ Metamorphoses, 14. 639
^ Myth Index – Andreus
^ Paus. 9. 34. 9 – 9. 35. 1

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Smith, William, ed. (1870). “article name needed”. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 

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Kings of Thebes

Kings

Calydnus
Ogyges
Cadmus
Pentheus
Polydorus
Nycteus (regent for Labdacus) and Lycus I (regent for Labdacus)
Labdacus
Lycus I (regent for Laius)
Laius
Amphion and Zethus
Laius (second rule)
Creon
Oedipus
Creon (second rule) (regent for Eteocles and Polynices)
Polynices and Eteocles
Creon (third rule) (regent for Laodamas)
Lycus II (usurper)
Laodamas
Thersander
Peneleos (regent for Tisamenus)
Tisamenus
Autesion
Damasichthon
Ptolemy
Xanthos

In literature

Antigone
Antigone (Euripides)
The Bacchae
Herakles
Iliad
Oedipus
Oedipus at Colonus
Oedipus the King
The Phoenician Women
Seven Against Thebes
The Thebans

Related articles

Thebes
Necklace of Harmonia

Book:Theban Kings
Category:Theban kings
Portal:Ancient Greece

Birla School, Kalyan

Coordinates: 19°15′00″N 73°08′47″E / 19.250128°N 73.146450°E / 19.250128; 73.146450 Birla School, Kalyan (CBSE Board) is a school in the Thane district of Mumbai Metropolis, Maharashtra India.

Birla School

Location

Kalyan, Maharashtra
India

Information

Type
co-educational

Established
1998 (1998)

Medium of language
English

Website
Official website

Contents

1 About
2 Co-curricular activities
3 References
4 External links

About[edit]
Birla School, Kalyan is a co-educational public school managed by Kalyan Citizen’s Education Society (KCES) and affiliated to Central Board of Secondary Education, Delhi. The school was founded in 1998 with the blessings of Syt. Basant Kumar Birla, Chairman of B.K. Birla Group of Companies and Dr. Sarala Birla. The school is located adjacent to Birla College, which also comes under the aegis of KCES. The school is spread over six acres of land and has the infrastructure of international standard. Mrs. Ranjana Jangra is the current principal of the school. It was ranked 6th in Mumbai in the national curriculum by the Times School Survey,2016.
Co-curricular activities[edit]
Birla School also has a new basketball court with the upcoming canteen facility. The school has 2 physics labs, 2 chemistry labs, 2 biology labs, 1 geography lab, 1 math lab and 4 sports rooms. It also has a computer lab. Yoga, martial arts, aerobics, music (singing and instrumental), dance (classical and contemporary), art and craft, maths club, reading club, science club, nature club, oratorical club, art and craft club, creative club, drama club and sports club are some of the included activities round the year. It has a library with a wide range of books.
Located in the heart of the Taluka, Birla School comes under the KCES and Century Rayon, Shahad led by Mr. O. R. Chitlange.[1]
References[edit]

^ Century Rayon Official Website

www.birlaschoolkalyan.com
External links[edit]
Documentary Film on Birla School by Makshi Infotech

George P. Barker

George Payson Barker (October 25, 1807 in Rindge, Cheshire County, New Hampshire – January 27, 1848 in Buffalo, Erie County, New York) was an American lawyer and politician.
Life[edit]
He attended Amherst College from 1823 to 1826, and then entered Union College from which he graduated in 1827. While in college, he studied law with Alonzo C. Paige at Schenectady, New York, after graduating he studied law with Stephen G. Austin at Buffalo, and was admitted to the bar in 1830. He practiced law in partnership with Austin until 1832, then with John T. Hudson until 1836. In 1834, he married Abby Coit. From 1837 to 1839, he practiced law with Seth E. Sill and Seth C. Hawley, then with Sill only until July 1847, and finally with George Coit, Jr.
Political career[edit]
In 1828, he entered politics joining the Jacksonians, and later becoming a Democrat. In June 1829, he was appointed Clerk of the Village of Buffalo. In 1831 he ran for the Assembly, but was defeated by the Anti-Masonic candidates. In 1832, he was appointed first Attorney of the City of Buffalo, later District Attorney of Erie County which office he resigned in December 1836. In 1834, he ran for Congress but was defeated by the Anti-Masonic candidate Thomas C. Love.
He was a member from Erie County of the New York State Assembly in 1836. On January 31, 1838, he was commissioned a captain in the New York State Militia, on February 12 he was elected a major, on August 14 a lieutenant colonel, and in June 1839 brigadier general of the 8th Brigade, retiring from the militia when he was elected Attorney General in 1842. In 1840, he ran for Mayor of Buffalo, New York, but was defeated by the Whig candidate Sheldon Thompson in a close race: 1135 for Thompson, 1125 for Barker. He was New York State Attorney General from 1842 to 1845. From 1846 to 1847, he was again District Attorney of Erie County.
Sources[edit]

[1] Political Graveyard
[2] Mayors of Buffalo
Google Book Life of George P. Barker by George J. Bryan (Oliver G. Steele, Buffalo NY, 1849)

Legal offices

Preceded by
Willis Hall
New York State Attorney General
1842–1845
Succeeded by
John Van Buren

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Attorneys General of New York

Benson
Varick
Burr
M Lewis
Lawrence
J Hoffman
Spencer
Woodworth
Hildreth
Van Vechten
Hildreth
Emmet
Van Vechten
M Van Buren
Oakley
Talcott
Bronson
Beardsley
Hall
Barker
J Van Buren
Jordan
Chatfield
Stow
O Hoffman
Cushing
Tremain
Myers
Dickinson
Cochrane
Martindale
Champlain
Barlow
Pra